Monday, June 23, 2008

For The Record: Primate Research at UW Madison

For The Record: Primate Research

WISC-TV's Neil Heinen and his panel debate the ethics, politics, and
potential of primate research and the University of Wisconsin-Madison's significant role in these controversial studies.

3 comments:

Anonymous said...

The stupidity of the Swiss dignity law has been discussed elsewhere:

http://www.nature.com/news/2008/230408/full/452919a.html

http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v453/n7197/full/453824b.html

http://www.tnr.com/currentissue/story.html?id=d8731cf4-e87b-4d88-b7e7-f5059cd0bfbd

Admittedly, the scientists did not offer an answer to the ethical standard question... but neither did the animal activists.

So the obvious question is:

What would YOUR ethical standard be that would allow experimentation in a given animal species (say worms, mice or monkeys)?

It seems to me that your failure to offer such a standard indicates the obvious: you are against all experimentation. A fact that you are trying to hide from the public.

Rick said...

Though vivisectors might label 'dignity' as a stupid notion, I don't, and I suspect that many others don't either.

"It seems to me that your failure to offer such a standard indicates the obvious: you are against all experimentation. A fact that you are trying to hide from the public."

I'm not too sure whom or what you are referring to. I wouldn't allow any experiment on any organism that appeared to act intentionally and resisted. I've written far too much for any informed person to claim that I'm hiding anything concerning my beliefs on this matter. I rescue earthworms after hard rains. I'm a vegan.

It is falacious to reason that because someone opposes research on mice, that therefore, their position on research on monkeys (or an anything else) must be erroneous. You are "thinking" like a vivisector.

Anonymous said...

The point is that in the interview you did not introduce yourself as a vegan that is against any sort of animal experimentation. If that's what you believe, why don't you state so in public?

The point is that you complain in the segment about a lack of ethical standards in primate research, but you failed to disclose yours:

"I wouldn't allow any experiment on any organism that appeared to act intentionally and resisted."

Bacteria can move away from noxious stimuli. Does it do it intentionally? Is it resisting? Would you ban research on baceria too until we better understand their minds?

Your 'standard' is entirely subjective and relies on a personal judgement of intentionality.

You are "thinking" like a vegetable... intentionally or not.